Publications

Development of novel methods for detecting and quantifying viable inoculum of Oculimacula yallundae and O. acuformis (PhD)

Project number
RD-2010-3729
PhD Supervisor
Dr Rumiana Ray, University of Nottingham
Partners
FERA
Start Date
01/10/10
End date
30/09/13
HGCA Funding
£37,500

 

The problem

Eyespot caused by Oculimacula yallundae and O. acuformis is considered to be the most damaging stem-base disease of cereals in temperate countries. Losses due to the disease are associated with direct losses in grain yield of up to 30%, and indirect losses due to eyespot induced lodging. In the UK, yield losses have been notoriously difficult to predict due to the sporadic nature of the disease and discrepancies with visual assessment of the disease during the early growth stages of the crop.  

Project aims 

To ascertain the role and contribution of inoculum quantity and viability from different sources (crop debris, infected leaf sheaths, stems) in disease development throughout the growing season and to determine any predictive relationship between viable inoculum early in the season and eyespot disease and yield loss at harvest.

Approach 

- To develop novel methods to identify and quantify live Oculimacula species (O. yallundae and O. acuformis also known as W-type and R-type eyespot, respectively) responsible for eyespot disease in cereals.
- To determine the most suitable technology for the quantification of viable inoculum in soil, crop residues and in planta by comparing existing assays (DNA based detection, microbiological techniques) with RNA detection methods.
- To determine any predictive relationship between viable inoculum early in the season and eyespot disease and yield loss at the end of the season.

Benefits to the industry

Novel methods of detection will facilitate more accurate disease forecasting and improve the predictive risk model which already incorporates other risk factors and environmental conditions. This will allow UK growers to discriminate individual field situations and control eyespot disease with increased precision, whilst minimising their crop production costs through targeted fungicide spray applications.

 

Related Publications

Document downloads

View printer friendly versions of these publications

Download this publication PDF
Download this publication PDF
Download this publication PDF
Download this publication PDF
current project thumb